01243 432485
07702 842190
emsnav@gmail.com

RYA Approved Training CentreMCA-training-approved
MCA Approved Engine Course (AEC)

MCA Approved Engine Course (AEC)

SPECIAL OFFER

MCA Approved Engine Course - 8th - 11th December 2014 - Only £495

The MCA Approved Engine Course (AEC) is aimed at giving a wide and general appreciation of basic marine diesel mechanics and electrics and also an understanding of the Chief Engineer’s responsibilities.
The course is the first level qualification for the MCA Engineering Officer training scheme. It is seen as the first rung on the engineering ladder for those with no formal marine engineering experience and is an ideal introduction for those who wish to improve and enhance their employment prospects in the various aspects of the marine industry e.g.

  • The super yacht industry
  • Commercial vessels
  • Marine support offshore wind farms
  • Private boat owners

This course can also be undertaken by any crew member: deck, stewards and chefs who wish to advance their employment prospects in this extremely competitive market place by being able to fill the Assistant Engineer position, or who simply wish to develop their engineering knowledge.

Having obtained the MCA Approved Engine Course certificate, it offers up the opportunity to fill the position of:

  • Chief Engineer on sailing yachts over 24m in length and less than 200gt and 750 Kw within 60 miles from a safe haven
  • Chief Engineer on motor yachts over 24m in length and less than 200gt and l500Kw within 60 miles from a safe haven
  • Act as the Assistant Engineer on vessels over 200gt within 60miles from a safe haven (under the Large Yacht code LY(2)

See MCA MGN 156(N) Annex A for more details of qualifications and manning requirements

The four day course is instructed by an experienced Super Yacht Marine Engineer who is thoroughly professional, conscientious and uncompromising in his approach to engineering and safety responsibilities. He has a track record of achievement both in the commercial super yacht business and as a Marine Engineering Officer within the Royal Navy, having completed 29 years within the service.

The course includes practical sessions as well as all the theory requirements and will cover:

  • The principles of two and four stroke engine operation
  • Construction of engines
  • The role of air in the combustion process
  • The fuel system
  • The cooling system
  • The lubrication system
  • Engine electrical systems
  • Power transmission
  • Hull fittings
  • Fault finding and rectification
  • Safe working practices
  • Bottled gas installations
  • Pollution prevention

To complete the course you must be at least 18 years old and have either one months experience as yacht engineer or have some formal engineer craft qualification

All equipment to complete the course will be provided. You just need to bring a pair of overalls and suitable footwear.

A Course Completion Certificate will be awarded provided the student has attended for the full 4-days.

Tea and coffee is provided and you can get lunch from the Deck Cafe in the marina or the village which is a short walk away. Alternatively you can bring a packed lunch to eat in the classroom.

1. Compression Ignition Engine

The general principles of the compression ignition engine c.f. spark ignition.

2. Cycle of Operation and Constructional Details

Engine cycles explained: Four Stroke and Two Stroke.
The essential engine components identified and the acquisition of basic terminology.
The meaning of engine terms such as: top dead centre, bottom dead centre, stroke, bore, swept volume, engine capacity, clearance volume and compression ratio.
Engine configurations: in line and vee engine types; side and overhead valve arrangements and side and overhead camshafts.
Engine performance data: interpretation of revs, torque and power curvesspecific fuel oil consumption.

3. The Fuel System

The nature of diesel engine fuels; gas oils and DERV and their related origins. The importance of fuel cleanliness and the avoidance of water ingress. Explanation of the conditions which lead to microbiological contaminations. Risks and consequences of fuel leakage contaminating the lubricating oil.
The fuel tank: filling, venting and isolating arrangements; the importance of weather tight sealing of filling cap. Adequacy of mounting and support arrangements and the importance of accurate indication of fuel contents.
Fuel pre-filter and water coalescer/separator.
Fuel lift pumps of diaphragm and plunger types.
Fine paper element filters.
Fuel injection pumps: in line jerk type and distributor pumping action. Fuel metering: helical, groove and metering valve (DPA).
Fuel injectors and the importance of good atomization to the clean and efficient running of the engine.
The importance of maintaining an adequate reserve of fuel and the consequences of allowing the level to fall too low. Basic fuel calculations using engine revs, power curves and SFOC with modifications for sea state.

4. The Role of Air in the Combustion Process

Concepts of fuel as an energy source and the essential air to fuel ratios for clean and efficient combustion.
Air filters wet and dry types and inlet manifold: the importance of adequate engine compartment ventilation.
The comparison between naturally aspirated and turbo charged engines against the background of volumetric efficiency. Engine power to weight ratios.
Turbo chargers: operating principles and "get you home" measures in the event of turbo charger failure.
Charge air coolers: intercooling / aftercooling.
The exhaust system: silencers, water injection elbows and syphon breaks.

5. The Cooling System

Outline of the temperatures involved in the combustion process and its effect on engine component materials: alloy, aluminium, cast iron and steel.
The cooling water circuit through the engine.
Raw water (sea water) cooling.
Fresh water cooling and heat exchangers.
The importance of maintaining the correct cooling water temperature and the functioning of the thermostat.
Cooling water pumps: rubber impeller and centrifugal.

6. The Lubrication System

The nature of friction, the composition of bearing materials and the role of lubricating oil in minimising the former and dissipating the heat produced.
The route of lubricating oil through the engine and the importance of maintaining oil at the correct level and in an adequate state of cleanliness.
Lubricating oil pumps of gear and lobe types.
Lubricating oil filters and the action of the pressure relief valve.

7. Engine Electrical Systems

Batteries: Lead Acid and Alkaline, their materials of construction, the electro-chemical processes and the explosive dangers of Hydrogen gas.
The rating of batteries: Ampere-hour and cold cranking capacity for engine starting duties and deep cycling requirements for ancillary loads such as navigation lights and domestic requirements.
Basic appreciation of the battery discharge versus recharge relationship. Simple calculations to show the importance of maintaining batteries in an adequate state of charge.
Twin battery installations and split charging arrangements. Risks posed by diodes due to voltage surge from open circuit conditions.
The a.c. generator (Alternator) and its drive belt.
Pre-engaged starter motors.
Engine stopping arrangements - manual and solenoid operated. Emergency stopping by obstructing the air intake.
Cold starting aids.
Basic circuit diagrams and engine instrumentation - sender units and their locations.
Safety features in the electrical distribution system such as fuses and breakers and the importance of bonding/earthing.

8. Power Transmission

Reduction/reverse gear boxes and cone and plate clutches. Mechanical and hydraulic modes of operation.
Control systems: Bowden cables and rods. Safety considerations.
Propeller shafting and couplings. The importance of accurate alignment and engine mountings - both rigid and flexible.
Stern tube bearings and sealing arrangements - both traditional packed glands and seals such as Deep Sea Seals.
Introduction to the basics of propeller matching to hull speed and engine power and revolutions.

9. Hull Fittings

The maintenance of sea cocks and the importance of annual inspection.
Cathodic protection systems and associated bonding circuits.

10. General

Marine pollution legislation in both MARPOL - Annex I covering oil and MARPOL - Annex V covering garbage.
Code of Safe Working Practices, safety consciousness and awareness of potential fire hazards. Basic fire-fighting techniques. The use and hazards of fixed fire extinguishing systems:

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)
Halon
"FM 200"
"Pyrogen Aerosol"

Bottled LPG installations - safety requirements to ISO10239.

NOTE:

Fault finding and rectification will be covered within each part of the syllabus as the individual topics are covered.

MCA Approved Engine Course (AEC) – FAQ’s

These are a few of the questions we get asked by people booking on the MCA Approved Engine Course. If you have any further queries or are unsure whether this is the course for you please call us on 01243 432485 and we will be only too happy to chat to you.

What time does the MCA Approved Engine Course start and finish?

Typically we start at 9.00am and finish at about 5.30pm with an hour break for lunch

What is included in the course fee?

The price includes all course materials and certificate fees.

Where is the course held?

It will be held at one of our classrooms in Emsworth Yacht Harbour, Thorney Road, Emsworth, Hants PO10 8BP

How many people will there be on the course?

We have a maximum of 6 people on a course, though usually the numbers are smaller than this. This ensures that you get maximum attention from the instructor.

Who is a typical MCA Approved Engine Student?

We have had a range of people attending our course including:

  •  Crew and Skippers on support vessels for the Marine Wind Farms
  •  Deckhands on superyachts
  •  Private boat owners who want to be able to maintain and repair their own engines

What qualification will I receive on completion of the course?

On successful completion of the course you will be awarded the MCA Approved Engine Course completion certificate.

Are there any exams on the MCA Approved engine Course?

On the final afternoon you will have to complete a short written paper.

What is the purpose of the AEC course?

The AEC is aimed at giving a wide and general appreciation of basic marine diesel mechanics and electrics and also an understanding of the Chief Engineer’s responsibilities.

Will the course give me a qualification which could help me become a Marine Engineer?

The course is the first level qualification for the MCA Engineering Officer training scheme and is seen as the first rung on the engineering ladder for those with no formal marine engineering experience.

I have worked on Sailing Yachts in the past as a deck hand - would you consider me? 

This course can be of interest to all crew members: deck, stewards and chefs who wish to advance their employment prospects in this extremely competitive market place by being able to fill the Assistant Engineer position, or who simply wish to develop their engineering knowledge.

If I get the qualification what will I am able to do with it?

Having obtained the certificate, it offers up the opportunity to fill the position of:

  • Chief Engineer on sailing yachts over 24m in length and less than 200gt and 750 Kw within 60 miles from a safe haven
  • Chief Engineer on motor yachts over 24m in length and less than 200gt and l500Kw within 60 miles from a safe haven
  • Act as the Assistant Engineer on vessels over 200gt within 60miles from a safe haven (under the Large Yacht code LY(2)

See MCA MGN 156(N) Annex A for more details of qualifications and manning requirements

Who would be teaching the course?

The four day course is instructed by an experienced Super Yacht Marine Engineer (MJ Marine Training) who is professional, conscientious and uncompromising in his approach to engineering and safety responsibilities. He has a track record of achievement both in the commercial Super Yacht business and as a Marine Engineer Officer within the Royal Navy, having completed 29 years within the Service.

What do I need to have to be considered for the course?

To complete the course you must be at least 18 years old and have either one month’s experience as yacht engineer or have some formal engineer craft qualification. If you are not sure whether you have the relevant experience, please contact us as we will only be happy to discuss it with you

What would I need to bring?

All equipment to complete the course will be provided. You just need to bring a set of overalls and suitable footwear and proof of ID.

What will you provide in the way of victuals?

Tea and coffee is provided and you can get lunch from the Deck Cafe in the marina or the village which is a short walk away. Alternatively you can bring a packed lunch to eat in the classroom.

Is accommodation included in the price?

No, you will need to provide your own accommodation, though we can give you a list of local B&B’s and hotels if you require it,

How do I book?

Just click on the book now button

 

 

 

Very good course.  Instructor used good level of practical and lecture materials.

Kevin Gorringe

I would like to thank yourself and Martyn for looking after me. I/we had a great time, I sort of turned up thinking I would know most of the things Martyn was going to talk about (but guess i didn;t lol)  I was really impressed with the course.  Martyn really does know his stuff.  Thanks mate.

David Foote

Excellent course overall.  Well equipped school and location.  Brilliant instructor, open style, interesting, gets learning points across effectively, really enjoyed everything

Karl Fisher

Done a few courses these last few months and this was by far the most informative and enjoyable.

Richard Walker

Thank you for organizing the course, it was really great. 

Istvan Radi

Thank you for all your help, I will be recommending you for further training.

Stephen Giles

I just wanted to say how good the course was last week Martyn was a brilliant tutor and such an interesting man, the course has given me the confidence to go ahead with my plan to start working for myself as a marine engine and electrics technician.

Bill Wardoper

MCA Approved engine Course (AEC) - Dates

Monday, 19 January - Thursday, 22 January 2015

Monday, 09 February - Thursday, 12 February 2015

Monday, 09 March - Thursday, 12 March 2015

To book on a course please click the book now button on the right of the page or to discuss your requirements you can contact us seven days a week from 8.00a.m to 7.30pm on 01243 432485 or 07702 842190
MCA Approved Engine Course (AEC)

Cost: £ 550

Next Course Dates

Mon 19 January - Thu 22 January

Mon 09 February - Thu 12 February

Mon 09 March - Thu 12 March

Emsworth School of Navigation

Emsworth Yacht Harbour
Thorney Road
Emsworth
Hampshire
PO10 8BP

01243 432485
07702 842190
emsnav@gmail.com